Post Production

What to Do If Adobe CC 2017 Drops Magic Bullet Suite 12


Written by Al Caudullo

al-crazy-pc-problem

Magic Bullet Suite 13 has just arrived along with the new version of Adobe CC 2017. But if you have the Creative Cloud subscription you may run into some issues with using your Magic Bullet Suite 12. The new Suite of tools from Red Giant are fantastic and the real-time performance alone is worth the price of the upgrade, but if your budget forces you to wait, Red Giant Magic Bullet Suite 12 will continue to work for you although you may need to do some coaxing to get Adobe CC 2017 to play nice.

So before you get like that crazy guy above put down the hammer and have a look at some fixes to your issue.

adobecc2017-blog-large

There are two parts to this so try these steps first before going on to the more complex ones.

1. It is true that the Colorista III is not *officially* supported in CC 2017.  That isn’t the same thing as saying it doesn’t work. What it means is that we will not continue to develop it and address bugs that arise from the new host app. We only update and give maintenance to the latest versions of our software.
2. That said, if you install CC 2017 and already had Colorista III installed it will show up and function in CC2017 – for now. However, if anything changes in Adobe CC that causes our plug-ins not to run properly in CC2017, we will only fix the current versions.
3. If you don’t have CC2015 on your computer and only have CC2017, you can install Colorista III. Run the installer and select the option to install for CC2015. Since both CC2015 and CC2017 share the same mediacore directory for plug-ins, Colorista III will show up in CC2017.
Obviously, for many reasons, we don’t recommend continuing to work with older plug-ins in a new, untested host-application. But, for now, Colorista III actually still works fine in CC2017.
4. And of course, users can keep CC2015 installed alongside CC2017, so that if there are any issues in the future with Colorista III running in CC2017, those older projects could be opened in CC2015 and the plug-ins should work fine.

redgiant-01

Now, if that doesn’t work and if you are still in that situation here is what I did after getting assistance from Support at Red Giant. Big thanks go out to Elysee L, my Customer Advocate at Red Giant, she did a fantastic job.

So here is the step by step guidance:

Please note that not all steps may be applicable (there may not be anything in some of the folders provided), so just skip those steps if that’s the case:

  • Close all intensive programs, namely Premiere, After Effects, etc.
  • Back-up and remove the contents of C:\Program Files\Adobe\Common\Plug-ins\7.0\MediaCore\. You can do this by temporarily moving whatever files are there to another location on your drive or compressing them into a folder for access later.
  • Re-launch Premiere with your Shift key held down until the Adobe splash screen disappears. This will re-build your registry and plugin cache to ensure Premiere’s being given a fresh start, which should clear out the flags that were keeping our plugins from loading into Premiere.
  • Close Premiere, we’re about to start putting the plugins back in, and Premiere shouldn’t be open when that happens since it’s installing files into that program.
  • From your MediaCore folder backup, put one of problematic plugin files back in the original location. This step will help ensure it’s the registry that’s causing the problem; if Premiere still doesn’t load the plugin when it’s the only thing in the MediaCore folder, let me know and we’ll troubleshoot from there.
  • Re-launch Premiere and check that the plugin is present. Make sure you’re looking in the right location, and don’t use the search feature within Premiere to find it.
  • Close Premiere, and select another plugin file to move back into its original location. This is where things get cumbersome; you’ll need to move the plugins back into their old location one at a time. Don’t move more than two plugin files before heading to the next step.
  • Re-launch Premiere after putting back each individual plugin, not only to check that the plugin file you moved can now load, but also to set a flag in the registry that’ll ensure the plugin loads in subsequent launches.
  • Repeat until all of our plugins are installed. So you’ll replace a plugin, launch Premiere, check that it’s there, close premiere, and install another plugin. If you have a lot of plugins and this getting to be too much of a chore, you may be able to move in more than one at a time to cut down on the process, but I wouldn’t push it.
  • Repeat until all plugins have been brought back into the program and are loading successfully. If, at any point, loading a specific third party plugin (other than ours) causes the problem to come back or for plugins to get kicked out of Premiere, you’ll need to contact that third party developer for assistance with that, as it may be an incompatibility issue on their end that they’ll need to address.